Archive for the 'transboundary water' Category

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India, China ink key accord on river information

Photo retrieved from: www.ooskanews.com

“The Memorandum of Understanding on trans-border rivers was inked after talks between Prime Minister Manmohan Singh and Chinese Premier Li Keqiang in the Great Hall of the People here.

According to sources, the agreement is a “major diplomatic achievement” as it is the first time that China has agreed to acknowledge India’s rights as a lower riparian state.

India’s consistent raising of the issue of China’s dam building activities on the Brahmaputra river, known as Yarlang Tsangpo in China, has helped in Beijing becoming more accommodating this time, they said.

This time the agreement takes into account the environmental concerns of India on the Brahmaputra, including the damage to flora and fauna due to China’s dam building upstream. Beijing says its dams are run of the river dams.

According to the agreement, the two sides “recognized that trans-border rivers and related natural resources and the environment are assets of immense value to the socio-economic development of all riparian countries”.

Both sides also agreed to flood-time exchange of hydrological data on 15 more days – from “May 15 instead of June 1 to Oct 15th”.

Advancing the date by 15 days, at a time when the melted glacier ice of the Tibetan plateau begins to flow downstream, is also a major achievement, the sources said.

“The two sides agreed to further strengthen cooperation on trans-border rivers, cooperate through the existing Expert Level Mechanism on provision of flood-season hydrological data and emergency management, and exchange views on other issues of mutual interest,” the agreement states.

Read more: Daily News

 

Fukushima radiation readings spike to highest levels

Radiation readings around tanks holding contaminated water at the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant have spiked by more than a fifth to their highest levels, Japan’s nuclear regulator said Wednesday, heightening concerns about the cleanup of the worst atomic disaster in almost three decades.

Radiation hot spots have spread to three holding areas for hundreds of hastily built tanks storing water contaminated by being flushed over three reactors that melted down at the Fukushima Daiichi plant in March 2011.

The rising radiation levels and leaks at the plant further inflamed international alarm, one day after the Japanese government said that it would step in with almost $500 million of funding to fix the growing levels of contaminated water at the plant.

Readings just above the ground near a set of tanks at the plant showed radiation as high as 2,200 millisieverts (mSv), Japan’s Nuclear Regulation Authority (NRA) said Wednesday. The previous high in areas holding the tanks was the 1,800 mSv recorded Saturday.

READ MORE: Al Jazeera